Probability VS. Possibility

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Photo courtesy of ponsuwan/Freedigitalphotos.net

At Lost Dogs of Wisconsin, we never say never.  We have had too many surprises and unlikely scenarios play out in the last few years.  But, that being said, we have learned a few things from the thousands of successful reunions that our organization and those of our sister sites have been involved with.

An owner that focuses the majority of their effort on what “probably” happened to their dog; rather than worrying about what “possibly” happened, is far more likely to have a quicker, more successful recovery.

Consider the weather. Is it possible for it to snow on any given day of the year in Wisconsin? Yes.  Is it probable? No.  So you can probably safely leave your parka at home in August.

Some examples pertaining to dogs:

  • A dog lost from a car accident that is not being pursued will probably stay within a 1/2 mile radius of where the accident occurred. 
  • A small friendly dog lost in a populated area has probably been picked up, often very close to where they went missing from.  They can be taken to a shelter, stray holding facility or rescue; or kept, or rehomed.
  • A shy, fearful dog is probably still “out there” learning to live on their own and avoiding people. 
  • A “dandelion”; common dogs that all look alike (eg. labrador retrievers)  are easily lost in the animal control/shelter system.

We have broken down our website articles to try to help you quickly “profile” your dog so that you can focus your efforts on probability. First; determine whether your dog has the risk factors of an elusive dog or an opportunistic dog.

Then read the corresponding articles from the Shy or Friendly categories on our website. Click on the categories on the right side of our webpage.

Our most likely “prediction” – most dogs are recovered because somebody that saw or knows something, saw a flyer or sign for the missing dog. Go door to door in the area that your dog was last seen and ask everybody if they have seen your dog. Use intersection signs to attract the attention of passing motorists.

Don’t delay! Your lost dog is depending on YOU to bring him safely home.

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